Review Emsa Travel Mug

After owning a couple of cheap merchandise insulated travel mugs, Jens Dittmar convinced me to spend a couple of euros on a “professional” travel mug. (In the end I convinced my boss to buy a bunch of mugs for the whole team as a christmas present so I didn’t have to buy one myself 🙂 )


After using the mug for one and half year I can say that it really improved my life quality. Suffering from stomach-ache I tried to reduce my filter coffee intake and switched to espresso from a Bialetti stovetop mokka cooker. By using the travel mug I could enjoy my yummy espresso which I cooked at home at work the whole morning, too. As I started to go to barcamps the mug also saved lots of paper cups.

Marketing claims

What I was really interested in -from an engineering standpoint- was to prove if their claim “4 hours hot – 8 hours cold” was valid or not. Continue reading “Review Emsa Travel Mug”

Node.js with PyCharm

PyCharm amazes me every time. Although it is first and foremost a python IDE you can do full stack web development with it, i. e. you have code completion for HTML, CSS, JavaScript and even TypeScript, CoffeeScript.

I wanted to code some node.js stuff and jetbrains already got a plugin for PyCharm. Before installation:

https://www.jetbrains.com/help/pycharm/2017.1/node-js-and-npm.html

The installation is painless and after a restart you have full node.js support!

 

Developer Camp 2017 – Part 1

Tl;dr: I was having a blast!

The Developer Camp 2017 took place at Z-Bau in Nuremberg on May 17th and 18th. 130 people gathered around 10:30 on Wednesday to plan the upcoming sessions.


The worst thing about barcamps: there are far too many sessions with great topics in parallel. So it is tough to pick the right ones for yourself.

34 sessions on Wednesday and 30 sessions on Thursday are a hell of a lot of topics.

So, which ones did I choose? Continue reading “Developer Camp 2017 – Part 1”

Ruby Day 1 – Seven Languages in Seven Weeks

My friend Timo recommended the book “Seven Languages in Seven Weeks” to me a couple of months ago. During my parental leave I’ve finally found time to read -and more important-  code the exercises.

The first language is Ruby. Ruby is object-oriented, dynamically and strongly typed. It supports duck typing and is a good fit for developing DSLs. Continue reading “Ruby Day 1 – Seven Languages in Seven Weeks”

Division in Python 2 vs 3

One major change in Python 3 is the implementation of the division operator /.

In Python 2 the division yielded a floor rounded integer when dividing two integers but a float when using a float as divider or divisor. Due to Python’s weakly typed nature this behavior could lead to some issues. So PEP-238 changed the behavior of the operator in Python 3 and introduced a new operator // in Python 2.2. Let’s have a look at the different behavior [table id=5 /]

If You want to use the new behavior of operator / from Python 3 in Python 2 you can do:

from __future__ import division

So have fun when You divide and conquer 🙂

Debunking 3 iOS Development Myths

Let’s debunk some myths about iOS development:

Myth #1 – You need to code Objective-C

False – since 2014 you have an alternative: Swift. This language is open source under the Apache License 2.0 (since Swift 2.2) and even runs on Linux

Myth #2 – You need to be enrolled in the Apple Developer Program

False – To develop your app and test it on your own device you just need to have an Apple ID which You likely already have if you’ve ever purchased something in the iTunes or app store.

Side note: If you are looking forward to integrate Siri or Wallet or iCloud into your own app you’ll have to pay. Bummer 🙁

Myth #3 – You need to own a Mac (iMac, Mac Book, Mac Pro)

In theory yes, because you have to run XCode which is only available on Mac OS X. But wait: What if I run Mac OS X elsewhere? You can use a VMWare or Virtual Box as well or even build your own hackintosh.

 

 

My first iPhone App

After carrying around my iPhone 6 for two and a half years I finally wanted to know how to build an iOS app.

Getting started

I used this tutorial from apple and rolled with the punches:

Installing XCode

takes ages!  Download 4,6 GB 🙁

First issue: when accidentally making the wrong connection between a UI-Element and the ViewController (@IBOutlet instead of @IBAction) You have to remove the connection in the code _and_ in the storyboard via context menu.

First own app

After I was done with the tutorial I wrote an app I always wanted to write:

A music player app to make learning songs easy. Use case: You want to learn a solo from e.g. Metallica’s “Nothing else matters” and You want to play along the music.

Requirements so far:

Continue reading “My first iPhone App”

New Year’s Resolutions & Technology Learning Roadmap 2017 – Update

In New Year’s Resolutions & Technology Learning Roadmap 2017 I listed all my tech and non-tech objectives for 2017. Here is a quick update:

After I bought my new Mac Book I asked myself: “Why haven’t I tried to develop an iOS app before?”
Well, I think it had something to do with Objective-C which I considered awful back in the days. But since 2014 You have another option: Swift.

The language looks a lot better to me, somewhere between Java and Python.

So I gave it a try and started the first tutorial. And -tada- there are two new objectives on my list. “Write an iPhone app” and “Publish app in app store”.

To get on with the objective “Learn Angular 2” I bought the course: “Angular2 verstehen und anwenden” on Udemy for 10€