The Agile Manifesto

When you are working in an agile team e.g. Scrum you might have heard about the agile manifesto. Formulated in 2001 it influenced a lot of software developers and methodologies like Scrum.

The Agile Manifesto consists of 4 values and 12 principles:

Values

Principles

  1. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software.
  2. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer’s competitive advantage.
  3. Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale.
  4. Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project.
  5. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done.
  6. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation.
  7. Working software is the primary measure of progress.
  8. Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely.
  9. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility.
  10. Simplicity–the art of maximizing the amount of work not done–is essential.
  11. The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams.
  12. At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.

Moving Motivators

An interesting technique from the Management 3.0 book “Managing for happiness” is the moving motivators exercise.

Motivators

Jurgen Appelo compiled motivational factors from different sources like Steven Reiss’ 16 basic desires, Ryan and Deci’s self determination theory and last but not least Daniel Pink’s Drive!

He came up with the following list of 10 motivators which can be best memorized with the mnemonic “CHAMPFROGS”: Continue reading “Moving Motivators”

Kudo Cards

What is Kudo?

Kudo is Greek for fame or honor.

The idea behind Kudo Cards is to say “Thank You” in a meaningful way. By taking the time to specify and write down what you are actually grateful for.

Variations

As an alternative to just give a card to a co-worker, you can enhance the whole experience by building a Kudo Wall so that everyone can see which kudos were given from whom to whom.

Another nice variation is to put up a Kudo Box. You can put in the cards and at the end of the year / quarter / month you can do a tombola and give away some swag for every drawn lot.

You can either print Kudo cards yourself or buy a very nice box of high quality cards from the M30 webshop

Distributing your own package on PyPi

In Regular Expressions Demystified I developed a little python package and distributed it via PyPi.

I wanted to publish my second self-written package as well, but coming back after almost a year, some things have changed in the world of PyPi, i.e. the old tutorials aren’t working anymore.

So I wrote this article to bring some clarity into this topic.

Distutils vs Setuptools

Continue reading “Distributing your own package on PyPi”