How to use Greasemonkey to make your life easier

Motivation Sometimes you encounter websites which seem to have time traveled from 1999. No responsive UI, no widgets, just plain html input fields and selects. Time to improve these sites 🙂 Greasemonkey overview Greasemonkey is a browser plugin which lets you inject client-side JavaScript into the webpage just as the developer could have intended to…

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JavaScript modules

<head> <script src=”../js/constants.js” type=”module”></script> <script src=”../js/script.js” type=”module”></script> </head> constants.js export const projects = [ “Project-A”, “Project-B”, “Project-C”, ]; script.js import {projects} from “./constants.js”;

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Calculator for Resistor Values

Calculator for 4 rings 1. Ring 2. Ring 3. Ring 4. Ring Value Tolerance brownredorangeyellowgreenbluepurplegreywhite blackbrownredorangeyellowgreenbluepurplegreywhite blackbrownredorangeyellowgreenbluepurplegoldsilver brownredgreenbluepurplegoldsilver 0Ω 0% Calculator for 5 rings 1. Ring 2. Ring 3. Ring 4. Ring 5. Ring Value Tolerance brownredorangeyellowgreenbluepurplegreywhite blackbrownredorangeyellowgreenbluepurplegreywhite blackbrownredorangeyellowgreenbluepurplegreywhite blackbrownredorangeyellowgreenbluepurplegoldsilver brownredgreenbluepurplegoldsilver 0Ω 0%

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JavaScript: dot vs bracket notation

During linting my code jshint gave me the “hint” that I should prefer dot notation over bracket notation. “testcase”: data.finding[“testcase”], [‘testcase’] is better written in dot notation. What is that? Accessing members with “.” is called “dot notation”. Accessing them with [] is called “bracket notation”.  

Lint your JavaScript with grunt and jshint

After I’ve introduced You to Yarn I will show You more client side tools in this post. Grunt is a task runner which comes in handy for a lot of setup and configuring work e.g. concatenating and minimizing JavaScript or CSS files To get started You can add grunt via yarn to your project yarn…

Inefficient jQuery Selectors

My PyCharm IDE warns me if I use inefficient jQuery selectors: As I am a bit nosy I wanted to know “how” inefficient these selectors are. So I compared the inefficient $(“#items tbody”); with the optimized $(“#items”).find(“tbody”); Here is the test code: window.onload = function () { test(“unoptimized”, function () { for(var i = 0;…