Review “Der Bohlenweg” by Dieter Bohlen

We continue with motivational literature. After having lured you with reviews of the biographies of Richard Branson and Gene Simmons, today is a book from local climes.

Why Dieter Bohlen?

“Phew,” I hear some say, “I’m supposed to read or even buy a book from this dude?

Of course this is the parting of the ways: some consider him the superstar par excellence, the others would never admit publicly that you watch his programs, listen to his music and even envy him a little bit for his success.

One thing you have to let Dieter Bohlen: his almost painful honesty when he expresses his opinion. That never gets boring.

Anything but boring is his book “Der Bohlenweg – Planieren statt Sanieren”, although it could be classified primarily as a business advisor.

Business counselor?

Yes. What many do not know is that this man not only started a business degree but also successfully completed. “Completing”, “putting into action”, “finishing” is his mantra that sets him apart from the pure verbal acrobats.

“The key is to have an idea and to push it against all odds”

The little Dieter was anything but predestined to become a titan of pop music, we learn in Chapter Two: not a musical early education but the prospect of taking over the paternal road construction company. No one has been waiting for him and his music, on the contrary.

That which he throws at the head of the DSDS candidate today, he heard himself often enough in his early days and still or just because of this continued. To enforce his idea against all odds, one thing is needed:

W O R K – HARD  WORK

So, at this point you could put the book aside, because everything is said. But we would still miss a lot of good material and spokes for example. Never find out why it is better to live in a small apartment than in a large villa.

His excursions into the handling of money are also extremely instructive. Bankruptcies and / or personal bankruptcies as with Matthias Reim, Roy Black and Drafi Deutscher: This can not happen to Dieter. Spend less than you take and realize from the outset that the uncle of the tax office is half of all revenue. Nix gross equal to net!

He also warns us against windy financial advisors, which of course only appear when there is money to invest. Why is that?

The motto that control is better than trust runs like a thread. Also, that falling is no shame, as long as you get up again, is one of the wisdom with which Mr. Bohlen delights us.

What impresses me most is that Uncle Dieter zuschmarrt one with his successes (1000 times platinum or so) but mainly describes the experiences in which he has properly used the toilet: Toggle contract, home purchase (scrap property) and the robbery he does not out.

Conclusion

Of course, his book does not replace his studies at Harvard Business School, but when someone like Dieter Bohlen, who apparently “made it” (TM) chats, I get a clue.

Often it is the simplest of rules (“always putting something on the high end”) whose consistent application makes the difference between success and failure. And no matter how one agrees with him: “Consistent” could be his middle name.